Five of our favorite writerly blogs

Writer Hillary Casavant shares top picks for blogs that keep her in the zone.
By Hillary Casavant, Editorial Assistant | Published: August 14, 2013


FistWhether you’re looking for industry insight, a quick laugh or a gritty interview with your favorite author, blogs dominate the web with must-have resources for writers. These five blogs keep my ideas fresh and my head in the zone, especially when I need a writer’s pick-me-up.

Beyond the Margins

A team of 11 accomplished novelists and industry professionals navigate the writing world through enlightening personal essays, interviews and tips for aspiring writers. Recent topics have included ways to avoid the “rabbit hole of research,” and how to “retrofit” the “spine” of your novel during revision. The site is also stocked with three years of archives for hours of reading pleasure.

Book Riot

A fun and informative resource on the latest news in book publishing, Book Riot introduces its readers to hot-off-the-press books and buzz-worthy authors. “Buy, Borrow, Bypass” posts help writers sift through the mountain of reading options, while regular “Critical Linking” posts round up the best writer-related news stories and blog posts on the web. Be sure to check out “Book Fetish,” plush with gift ideas for the writers in your life.

LitReactor

LitReactor blogs regularly with writer news, author interviews and craft essays that coincide with its selection of online workshops and writing classes. Guest bloggers have included staunch grammar defenders, fiction editors and well known writers such as Chuck Palahniuk. With several posts added each day, LitReactor is on the pulse of the latest industry developments.

Grammar Girl

Mignon Fogarty will solve grammar problems you didn’t realize you had. Her regularly updated blog is packed with tips that are straightforward and user friendly, useful information to tuck away for future writing projects. Whether you need a quick comma review or a grammar overhaul, you’ll find the solution on her page.

Easy Street Prompts

Pulling from Library of Congress and international archives, Easy Street Prompts shares photos and videos that capture lost moments from the past. The open-ended prompts present images with little commentary or direction from the editors, allowing writers to take their stories in boundless directions.