Writing Prompts

68 articles found

Literally

Our language is filled with idioms, phrases which have definitions different from their literal meanings. Clichés such as “at the drop of a hat,” “take the words out of your mouth” and “kick the bucket” creep unnoticed in our writing and everyday speech. Write a story or paragraph in which a character or scene literally …

By Hillary Casavant | Published: August 23, 2013

Sea and fog

You wake up on the deck of an empty boat. The boat is adrift, and you’re surrounded by fog. You check your pockets. No cellphone and the navigation equipment is broken. How did you get there? How do you get out? Share your writing in the comments section below. Please keep posts under 500 words.

By Hillary Casavant | Published: August 16, 2013

Twitter chatter

Take a cue from Twitter and write a story in 140 characters or less. How does the space restriction tighten your writing or convey a message? For inspiration, start with this classic, which tells a complete story in just 33 characters: “For sale: baby shoes, never worn.” Once you’ve whittled your story down to the …

Published: August 9, 2013

World of words

Got writer’s block? Step outside with a pen and notebook and find the words you’re missing. Keep your eyes peeled for a sidewalk message, a graffiti-covered wall or an abandoned sign. Once you see a word, make a list of all the emotions and images the word inspires. Use the word as a title of …

By Hillary Casavant | Published: July 26, 2013

Fashion passion

“Give a girl the right shoes and she can conquer the world.”—Marilyn Monroe Give an unusual piece of clothing or unique accessory to a character. How does this item reflect his personality? Does it change her persona? Use fashion to symbolize a nuance in the character’s identity.

By Hillary Casavant | Published: July 19, 2013

Curbside encounter

You’re walking through your neighborhood when you see three children sitting on the curb. It’s 11 a.m. on a school day. What are they doing there? Where are their parents? Are they happy, upset, scared? Write a scene about this encounter.

By Hillary Casavant | Published: July 12, 2013

Two truths and a lie

“Write the truest sentence that you know.” —Ernest Hemingway Write down 10 truths: historical facts, pop culture trivia or details about yourself. Then rewrite each item on the list so the truths become lies. Choose two truths and one lie as a base for your next story, poem or essay.

By Hillary Casavant | Published: July 5, 2013

History repeated

Imagine you could travel back in time to a moment in history: the invasion of Normandy, the flight of Amelia Earhart, the assassination of Abraham Lincoln. Write a description of the environment and capture the tension. Would your presence rewrite history?

By Hillary Casavant | Published: June 28, 2013

In the company of greatness

Imagine you could spend a single day with your favorite writer or poet, either living or deceased. What would you do? What questions would you ask him? What writing advice would she give you? Write about your day together, and incorporate the writing tips into your own work.

By Hillary Casavant | Published: June 21, 2013

Tale as old as time

“Anyone who keeps the ability to see beauty never grows old.” —Franz Kafka Imagine a character who has never grown old. What has he seen or experienced? How many people has she loved or lost? Does he see still see beauty in the world, or is he jaded? Write a character sketch of this person.

By Hillary Casavant | Published: June 14, 2013