Our Editors Recommend

QUIZ: Which new summer 2019 book should you read next?

See which of these new 2019 novels, nonfiction books, and short story collections are right up your alley … Read More “QUIZ: Which new summer 2019 book should you read next?”

A writer’s argument for political correctness

Choosing our words carefully creates a welcoming space on the page for all readers – and it makes for better writing, too … Read More “A writer’s argument for political correctness”

The secret to sharpening your fuzzy prose

Finding a rock on the beach reminds one editor of the importance of specificity and how it raises the emotional stakes … Read More “The secret to sharpening your fuzzy prose”

From the Archives: 20 questions to ask your character

First published in 1983, these questions are still wonderfully relevant for modern fiction writers. How many can you answer … Read More “From the Archives: 20 questions to ask your character”

What to take to a writing residency or retreat

Based on their previous experiences, writers provide packing tips and advice on how to maximize a writing residency or retreat … Read More “What to take to a writing residency or retreat”

Writing disabled protagonists in children’s and YA literature

Authors have called upon their experiences as parents of children with disabilities, and on volunteer work or extensive research, to create characters who reflect the … Read More “Writing disabled protagonists in children’s and YA literature”

Writing Prompts

Write about you (or your main character’s) earliest memory involving water … Read More “Summer writing prompt: Water, water everywhere”

Turning a dumb jock into a zombie is one way to cliché characters in fiction (Image: A green zombie quarterback throws a football)

Take a widely-known cliché character – the ditzy cheerleader, the dumb jock, the workaholic lawyer, the no-good cheating husband, the cat lady, etc. – and … Read More “Avoiding cliché characters in fiction”

Sometimes the hardest part is coming up with the first line. Use one, or all, of these first lines:
• Charlene leaned closer to the stranger … Read More “Your first line”

2019 spring short story contest

Submit your best fictional story in 2,000 words or less for your chance to win $1,000 & publication in our magazine.