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Four major publishing houses rejected Woody Allen’s memoir

Last year, the director quietly shopped around a manuscript, only to find zero takers.

Director Woody Allen tried to sell a memoir last year. Trouble is, no one wanted to buy it, the New York Times reports. 
Photo: Liam Goodner / Shutterstock.com
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Director Woody Allen tried to sell a memoir last year. Trouble is, no one wanted to buy it, the New York Times reports. 

Though Allen had reportedly written a full manuscript, some publishers declined to even read the draft. 

“Before the #MeToo movement roared to life, Allen’s memoir would probably have set off a bidding war and commanded six or seven figures, given his cultural status. But with his career all but derailed by resurfaced allegations that he molested his daughter Dylan Farrow nearly three decades ago — allegations that Allen denies and that have left Americans unsure whom to believe — the prospect of publishing his memoir seems to hold little appeal,” write Alexandra Alter and Cara Buckley in the Times. 

Amazon recently backed out of a multi-movie distribution deal with the director, citing that it would be impossible to make a profit of off an Allen project, given troublesome comments Allen had made regarding the #MeToo movement and statements from celebrities saying they regretted working with Allen. Some, like Rebecca Hall and Timothee Chalamet, donated salaries from Allen’s projects to anti-harassment charities. 

Allen is currently suing Amazon for $68 million as a result of the broken deal. 

Allen has written several books in the past, including Mere Anarchy, a humor collection published in 2007 that sold more than 40,000 copies. Previously, in 2003, the director almost reached a memoir deal with Penguin, but Allen balked at the $3 million deal. “For this I want a lot of money. The ball is in your court,” Allen wrote to his agent. 

Allen’s publicist and production company did not respond to requests for comments, the Times reports. 

 

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